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The day after tomorrow
background
Everything fiction?
The film
- Drilling for climate history
- Larsen B breaks SOS in the ice
- from heat to cold
The 'Pentagon Study'
Expectance for the future
     
 

climate up-to-date

The day
after
tomorrow

 

background
 

It begins in the 'ever lasting' ice ...

There is a lot about ice and snow in the film, but also in climate science.

Website and Trailer: www.thedayaftertomorrow.com

 

The plot:

The climatologist Prof. Jack Hall (Dennis Quaid) has predicted a new ice age. However, he would never even have dreamt that he would ever experience it for himself. Huge and sudden changes of the Earth's climate makes the climate system divert from it's natural balance, causing destruction and chaos: Floods, tornadoes, hail and temperatures, which have never previously been experienced to such an extent, menace the planet. Jack has to convince the president of the United States immediately that the whole country has to be evacuated, in order to save the lives of millions of people in danger, amongst them also the life of his son Sam (Jake Gyllenhaal). As Sam is trapped in the deeply frozen New York, Jack begins a dangerous travel against the time ...

Jack Hall is paleoclimatologist. This field of climate science investigates the climate of the past. Working in areas of permanent ice cover is not unusual in this sort of research ...

 

Jack Hall

Jack Hall (Dennis Quaid) is paleoclimatologist
20th Century Fox

 

Karte Antarktis

The map shows places in Antarctica, where ice cores have been taken.
Source: US National Ice Core Laboratory

 

Researchers like Jack Hall always have to undertake the unpleasant task of spending several weeks in Antarctica or Greenland in order to carry out deep drillings in the ice at temperatures as low as -40C. Here you can see a map of the sites, where such samples have been taken around the South Pole. The ice tells us about the climate of the past ... But we do not predict a new ice age.

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